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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 11:00pm EST
grew up in a south africa divided by apartheid. >> the anc has two options, continue doing same, which is the political party it is now, or it can make itself into a party of the 21st century. so it has to think about the young voters, the people who were born after apartheid, born even in the 1990s who are now the youngest voters in south africa, those are the voters that it has to create a strategy for, the voters they have to convince to go to the polls and vote. >> this is a crossroads isn't it? >> yes, it is a crossroads, it cannot claim just to be the party that liberated south africa, it has to create more positive claims. >> it can't rely on nelson mandela and its history. >> right. but it's about the history of libertying south africa from white rule. it is a history that doesn't build houses. it is a history that builds clinics and makes schools run. they have to try to put in place the kind of civil service that delivers that. >> because searveg has a lot of -- searve south africa has af problems it is dealing with. how much of that should be blamed on the anc, the ruling pa
Bloomberg
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
a property here. >> what has been the relationship of his image to the a.n.c., the african national congress. >> as before, he is definitely the biggest name, the biggest figure to come out of the a.n.c. he was the one who in the 40's formed the a.n.c. youth league. he then radicalized the a.n.c. and convinced the a.n.c. to pursue a program of sabotage against the apartheid government. he has always been the person everyone looks to. in his later years, he has faded. he has not had the presence to lead the organization anymore, but he has always been the point of reference. he has always been the one anyone would refer to if they the moral high ground, or if they wanted to talk about the direction of the country. >> now, is there a divide we need to understand when we think about south africa that still exists economically as well as educationally and socially? >> there has been a huge divide in south africa. south africa remains a very unequal society. white south africans on average earn six times more than the average black south africans. there is a huge racial component to all of this.
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm PST
early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life sentence, and for the first 18 years of it his cell on robben island had no bid, no plumbing of any
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
to give a psychological boost to the struggle of the anc and it's cause. and it also helped to further undermine the integrity of the apartheid regime there. >> i think that much credit should be given to organizations like transafrica to the senate and on the house side who continued to push sanctions forward. i must say against stout resistance from the republican admissioadministration that wasn office under ronald reagan. >> thethey were important and ty helped support the struggle there. and to begin to discredit the apartheid regime internationally and in the eyes of many the current campaining against south africa is a fad and morale hoola hoop and fun for a while. was that mostly because of cold war thinking at that time? there was a feeling that the anc was communist? >> i think so. there were many politicians in the united states and globally in western countries who felt that the anc was in fact an off shoot of the south african communist party. that it was affiliated with the larger com communist movement globally. i think they misunderstood history and they misunderstood t
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 5:00am PST
in the country. that's because he was a member of the anc the liberation movement that not apartheid in south africa for decades. movement that the white apartheid threw mandela in prison for being a part of, giving him a light sentence after releasing him after 27 years in captivity, even then, even in the summer of 1990, those first months after he had finally been let out of jail. even as south africa was finally starting to take those first frazzled steps away from apartheid in towards real genuine multi-racial draerks even then as nelson mandela was being hailed as a hero, all across the globe, the united states government officially considered him a member of a terrorist organization. they forced him to endure the endignitary of receiving a waiver of being told in effect, sure, come on in, we will give you some rewards, call you a hero. you are the revepgsception. the rest of the anc, we think they are terrorists. it wasn't until 2008 that congress passed and president george w. bush, not his father, it wasn't until five years ago the u.s. government got around to signing legislation th
MSNBC
Dec 8, 2013 11:00pm PST
of actually what was the case. when chris hani was an anc leader, was murdered, that was a seminole moment. you talked about when then mandela goes to f.w. de klerk and says, you have to stop this or virtually everything will go off the rails. >> and he went on television in south africa that night rather than de klerk ask showed that he was the father of the nation. as you know, i was with him when his father was murdered. we were in kuno, had just taken an early morning walk, the phone rang and he picked it up and got the news. he was on the phone for about 15 minutes, his expression never changed. he put down the phone and turned to me with a little ex aspiration and said, man, where is our porridge? he was so calm in a crisis and then he rose to that. he said that was when south africa was on the knife edge of a civil war. that was one of the most perilous moments of modern history. and he presided over the fact that they would repair themselves. >> charlene gault is with us in south africa. i want to show over the years of how mandela was featured, and that international claim that re
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm PST
. it caught fire. they began to educate and send their anc representatives out of the country and all over the world talking about what was going on. i introduced legislation in the california state assembly where i was serving to divest all of our pension funds from businesses that were doing business in south africa. that caught fire. and investment started all over the united states in various legislatures. the young people on the college campuses started to march and rally. transafrica forms and began to sit in at the south african embassy. we closed down the south african council here in los angeles, so the movement took hold. and we added to that the sanctions, the rallies, the protests, the education about what was going on, and it brought apartheid to an end. >> yeah, i think the key point if that is the grass-roots movement of divestment as the predicate to sanctions. it became the national government's policy version of what universities and cities and states and all sorts of cities were working on on a grass-roots level. i want to bring in thomas frank, author of "the wrecking c
CNN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00am PST
reagan's -- the anc because we called ate communist organization. i think the willingness to look at south africa beyond cold arrest terms even when the cold war was raging in the neigh years. >> when you talked to nelson mandela, did you find that he -- had he forgiven the west for, you know, having mostly for the most part sided against the anc? >> i think in my conversations with him, he forgive the west, yes, and he realized that a huge amount of learnings we can pick up from western leaders and in deed we did pick up a huge amount of learnings. i think for example, you remember quite well when he came out he emphasized a question that ultimately these enterprises are going to be nationalized and that was the policy of the anc and so forth and so on. i think it was because of his contacts with major western leaders that he was able to motivate that viewpoint. i'm not trying to suggest that mandela as some people like to suggest simply loving -- i think he succumbed to reason and that reason came from his peers largely in the west. >> peter, what do you think explains the dropo
CNN
Dec 8, 2013 10:00am PST
administration branded the anc a terrorist group and dick cheney voted against a resolution to release nelson mandela. so this was all happening around the world. >> right. i think peter godwin's point that south africa's transition was facile traitated by the end the cold what are is extremely important but it's important to remember in the 1980s a lobl anti-apartheid movement arose during the cold war in which people in america said we're not going to see south africa in purely cold war terms. we're not going to sep reagan's pacic envision that the apartheid regime is on the part of the free world because it's anti-communist and the anc, they are on the side of unfreedom. i think the willingness to look at south africa beyond cold war terms when when the cold war was raging was critically important to the transition in south africa. >> when you talked with nelson mandela, did you find that he -- had he forgiven the west for, you know, having mostly for the most part sided against the anc? >> i think in my conversations with him, he forgave the west, and he realized there's a huge amount of
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
which considered the anc a terrorist group, from margaret thatcher considered the anc a terrorist group and nelson mandela a terrorist. and this is the '80s. there was a lot of resistance to the idea of the government should fall, much less that this die vestment should take place at all. >> this was in the context of the cold war. and one of the most insidious things that the apartheid south african government did was they couched their oppression in terms of the communist struggle, that essentially the anc was riddled through with communists and pro-cubans. when nelson mandela was freed and made this tour. when he got to miami, he was actually rejected by the local government in miami, two mayors of miami and miami dade would not receive mandela because he was perceived as being pro-castro. so there was this whole sort of cold war fight that was tied up in the south african struggle. and it was part of the reason that the reagan administration opposed the idea of sanctions and divestment from south africa. >> please stay with us. >>> coming up, we will look at the presidency of nelson
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
people. >> reporter: mandela's african national congress, the anc, was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962, mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. for years, for decades the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> reporter: south africa became an international outcast. facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. >> reporter: rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. ♪ hey mandela >> reporter: in 1989, south africa's hard lined president resigned replaced by f. f.w. declerk who began to dismantle apartheid. the ban on anc was lifted. and on februar
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
, defenseless people. >> reporter: the anc was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962 mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. for decades the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> reporter: south africa became an international outcast, facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. ♪ >> reporter: rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. ♪ hey, mandela >> the release of nelson mandela. >> reporter: in 1989 south africa's hardline president p.w.bota resigned, replaced by f.w. clark who slowly began to dismantle apartheid. the ban on the anc was lifted, and
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
especially to the generation that came up after his story was well known that his organization the anc was not a non-violent organization. it was rough and he surrounded himself with some rough people. >> right. he started out being non-violent. and when he realized that the anc wasn't getting anywhere close to its mission, the group of leaders of the anc decided we need to become a military organization. and he started spear of the nation which was the military wing of the anc. and he taught himself. he read generals. he read caesar. he learned that like he learned everything. and it went against his grain, but again, as i was saying before, he had one overarching goal. and whatever got to that goal, he would do. even embracing violence. as you showed earlier, he refused to not embrace violence to get out of prison. because he said i can't negotiate while i'm in prison. that was the leverage he had. and he understood that. >> when you're in south africa as you know better than most, you don't hear mandela as much as you hear madiba. and as i was saying to charlayne, it's parental, it'
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 10:00am PST
winnie mandela was, what was apartheid, what is anc, that is african national congress. it took years leading up to dive divestment. because i was fortunate enough to serve on the board of trans africa we were part of the strategy that not only did rallying and arrested at the embassy and took over the south african consulate in los angeles but economic sanctions were extremely important to put pressure on the south african government to help bring down the unconscionable apartheid. so it took work, hard work. >> there was a movement across the country as congressman mentioned on campuses everywhere. i was covering it. ron, you in congress with a number of leaders an then some republicans joining in to try to finally pass the legislation. you authored one piece of legislation. it was compromised and finally passed and overrode veto. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine wa
KRON
Dec 5, 2013 11:00pm PST
joined the congress in his country with the anc formed a resistance. he was charged with treason and life in prison. he was in one of the most remote and harsh african prisons. he was freed at 71. within a few yearsar par years apartheid ended. in 2010 south africa welcomed the first world cup. >>> a freeze warning still in effect across the bay area. this morning people bundled up. this video from the east bay, but it was like that much of the bay area. it will be a little warmer, by that we mean a little warmer. jacqueline, how is it looking now? >> reporter: very very cold, pam. there are already sub freezing temperatures. it is 28 in santa rosa. 30 in vallejo. over toward livermore 29. south bay is 30s. 36 in half moon bay. 35 in san mateo. it will only get colder. widespread frost. on your car wind shield, there could even be black ice. we will stay that way overnight. temperatures range between 24 and 32. clear skies now. the storm will move into the bay area. it will be dropping down. we could see snow locally. >>> in richmond an arrest has been made in a gang rape case. it happene
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm EST
. because he became softer, that is not true. the policy of forgiveness reconsideration was always anc policy. so that it didn't take prison to do that. theory jet stream tried to plague down how badly it was treating the prisoners. this photograph was a staged event. >> you didn't know this was taken. >> no, we didn't know this was taken. >> the government was trying to make him think he was only doing light work, the prisoners had wondered why for one day only the laboring became easy, but it was to get tougher later, the laboring moved to what was an open lime quarry, 13 years of hard toll breaking rock, the dazzling reflection of white stone, damaging their eyesight. when they weren't laboring, they were sometimes allowed visits in this gloomy building, his second wife an activist herself came under a travel babb, one stage mandela waited two years between her visits. >> by regulation, there was a minimum of six months between each visit, and also by regulation, there was no contact. a screen between husband and wife, winny would sit on this side, the communication through a speake
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
. with him no longer as the spiritual leader of the anc. at least no longer on this earth. what is that going to do to politics going forward? >> when he walked away and said don't call me, i'll call you, he left politics. so for a number of years now, he has not been on the scene. i think to a certain extent, that's unfortunate. i think that this young democracy is having some missteps. >> it does feel that way. >> a few stumbles. it's difficult because mandela has not been there to way in. maybe at this moment when people are not on the streets, but contemplating what mandela stood for, they might come to a better moment than they are in currently. >> put into perspective, that was an amazing three or four-year period in history. when you look back, it's stunning and like how did we lose the momentum? we were almost there. >> it takes -- you did have prague and the berlin wall and the leaders who were able to have a vision. bush 41 had a vision in terms of german reunionification. there were leaders in different parts of the world. >> who seize the moment. >>a i new economic freedom was not
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
in south africa. but having him work with his team and the pollster for the anc during that first election, there were three things that really struck me. one was just his enormous clarity and vision for the country and bringing the country together. the second was his great pragmatism. there were a set of election rules that came down that were really disadvantageous to mandela and to the anc. we were all very upset by those rules, and he was just very calm and said no, we'll make it work. find a way to make it work. he refused to fight over the rules and just said we'll make it work. >> give us some unsight into that. what were his unique qualities that allowed him to make it work? in the face of what seemed to be something that was very difficult if not insurmountable. >> i think, first of all, was just the clarity of his own vision. the amount of thinking that he had done about where he wanted to take the country and what reconciliation meant. and how he had already put that to practice. that was so fundamental to his soul. and what was interesting is, of course, there were many factio
ABC
Dec 8, 2013 8:00am PST
. there were strong strands within the anc, within south africa, that were centered on black consciousness. he was intent on having an election with mandate that reduced their role. he focused on, as you know, the pan african congress, polling 2% or 3% of the poll. historically, they played a big role in africa and the liberation struggle. he wanted to use the election to send a message this would be an inclusive country. >> and jendayi frazer. talking about the relationship with people he didn't necessarily get along with. we know f.w. de klerk. they shared a nobel peace prize. everyone though they didn't share much of a relationship. nelson mandela, a fierce critic of president bush on the war in iraq and the invasion of iraq. he was determined to try to maintain something of a personal relationship there. >> actually, president mandela, as fierce a critic as he was to the war in iraq supported the war in afghanistan. if you recall, in 2001 when he first met president george w. bush as the president in the oval office, he came out and forcefully endorsed america going into afghanistan. just
MSNBC
Dec 9, 2013 10:00am PST
's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how you treated me. i'm free now and i can ya ya ya at you, not that at all. in fact, he was gracious, welcom
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
killed 69 people. at the time, nelson mandella was in his early 40s. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid has been nonviolent organizing. they decided maybe that wasn't enough and nelson mandella was one of the leaders who went underground to help start it. they would try to sabotage the state. they banned the amc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandella was arrested for treason in 1961. in 1962, he was convicted of traveling illegally. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. they convicted him and sentenced him to life on robin island. he began a new sentence that was a life sentence. and for the first 18 years of it, his cell had no bed, no plumbing of ne kind. he was permitted one visitor per year for 30 minutes. he became a symbol, worldwide, of the fight to stop apartheid. the south african government would not allow a picture of him to be taken in prison for decades. so the image was always him when he had been locked away. he served 27
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 7:00am PST
but he wasn't the leader of it. he embodied the anc's approach, their principles. but he wasn't the only one. during my time in south africa, especially in the late '80s, when apartheid still existed, i met any number of south african, leaders, rank and pile, who had been through terrible injustice. fellow graduates of robin island, for example. people who had been tortured or under banning orders. and almost to a person i heard similar words from them that we heard from nelson mandela after he was released from prison. and in many ways my love for south africa and my inspiration from south africans came from those years when mandela was still in prison, when we didn't even know what he looked like because there was only one old picture. he was the leader. he was the "avatar" of the movement. but there's much, much more, and he was standing on a firm base, firm foundation. >> you know, it's been surprising, mark, you know, on the one handle, this effort to sanitize mandela that we're seeing now, you know, i'm trying to make this kind of play around king, and yet also -- and this is maybe
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 2:00pm EST
to the standards of their white counterparts to give them both purpose and hope. >> the truth is the anc is la really struggled to fulfill nelson mandela's idealistic vision, school buildings are falling apart and crowding is rife. schools ton bleak cape flat south side cape town is more symbolistic of the system struggling with. activists argued there is a dangerous gap between promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate. but to graduate students only need 30% on their exams. a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> and the end of the study about 50% of those young people have fallen out of the system. so it also has to do with the curriculum, it has -- also has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had during end today. >> so schools are still struggling with the legacy of apartheid, its burden stubbornly persistent, the burdens of the system much longer than nelson mandela ever imagined. peter gresta, al jazeera, cape town. >> again as mills around the world gathered to remember the man they knew as the father of south af
KICU
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm PST
to continue talking peace and nonviolence against the government, is on these attacks. >> the anc was out lawed and in 1964, mandela was sentenced to life in prison, attempting to over throw the government. imprisoned on robbins island, he became a powerful symbol of resistance. he was released from prison in 1990 and emerged as the face of the antiapart i'd movement. he appeared before a standing room crowd at the oakland colosseum. >> it is you, the people of oakland, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my delegation strength and hope to grow. >> mandela stepped into negotiations with fk declerk to bring multieration-ratial democracy. he was the first black president. >> so help me god. never, and never again, shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one or another. >>> thousands of people have responded on our facebook page on the passing of mandela. you can join a conversation by going to ktvu chan 2 on facebook. >>> bart apologized for yesterday's emergency that stranded 700 people in a smokey disabled train. the train came to a stop?
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm PST
covering up some of the realities of how individuals regarded both the anc and more specifically, nelson mandela in all these eulogies? >> i think no doubt we are. nelson mandela's spiritual giant, political revolutionary, we are witnessing the santa clausification of nelson mandel. a we turned the revolutionary into an old man with a toy bag. no longer really full of the fire. we can at 95, brother nelson mandela was still full of fire. he had that militant tenderness and sub versive sweetness and radical gentleness, tied to refusing to be fearful or intimidated in the face of a vicious white supremacist apartheid regime. >> ted cruz, the senator from texas, paid respect on facebook. he said nelson mandela will live in history for defenders of liberty around the globe. someone said he was a murderer and a communist. another one said sad to see you feel this way. he was a terrorist. i guess you have only seen the hollywood movies. getting away from what the comment section of the internet generally is, let's talk about some of these specific charges. communist, terrorist. where do they c
FOX News
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm PST
to the truth. the united states was against the anc, the african national congress, because they were communists, they were backed by the ussr, and the united states being staunchly anti-communist, that's the right team, but they might have made the wrong choice. likewise, nelson mandela mail d the same exact mistake. he embraced countries like cuba, he misidentified them as comrades, when it should have been the people in the countries he identified with, because they were people under the thumb of gadhafi and under the thumb of khomeini and other nondemocratic countries. one thing you learned is how ideology at times can blind you to some very important facts. in the '80s, i was staunch anti-communist. i didn't pay attention to south africa. all i knew the anc was being backed by comb anytime munists learned that south africa was wrong. if you feel really strongly about this man, you can still act, because there's plenty of people around the world who are under the thumb of evil. and there's a lot of celebrities who don't care. there are women still being circumcised in africa. it's
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 9:00am PST
arrests for peaceful protests, anc's protest land mandela in prison for 27 years on charges of attempting to overthrow the government. the terms were notorious and brutal. the sentence confined him to a small cell for 27 years. for 18 of those years, mandela was allowed only one visitor a year for 30 minutes. he was able to write and receive one letter every six months and he was sentenced to hard labor. in those same decades that mandela lost his eldest son and mother, he was not allowed to attend their funerals. the miracle of mandela, after missing three decades of his life, after being closed off from three decades of change in the world mandela emerged without bitterness and without spite. upon his release mandela emerged hopeful. so hopeful he remained committed to working with the very same people who once imprisoned him all in the name of finding a solution for the people of south africa. when i walked out of prison, he wrote in his autobiography, it was my mission to liberate the oppressed and oppressor both. to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains but live in a way tha
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 6:00pm EST
of negotiation, not always with the support of his colleagues in the anc, in order to deliver not just a transfer of power that offered the prospect of peace for all the people of south africa. mandela once notably said, "this is not about moving from white domination to black domination. there must be no domination of either community." he was an extraordinary man in not only believing that but practising it with every fibre of his being. as we look today at the lessons of mandela's extraordinary life and incredible achievements, at his contribution not just to south africa, which goes without saying, but to the wider world and at why he has become such an iconic figure, two factors stand out. first, he is perhaps the best example we have had in the past 100 years of how political leaders, by force of personality, transform themselves from politicians into statesman can by their sheer personal effort change the world and make what was impossible possible and then deliver it. he is not the only one who has done so. we should not think of him as unique. gorbachev, by the force of his personality,
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 2:00pm PST
called at that time the anc terrorists and when he came out of prison, when he said i say to you all, take your guns, your knives, your pangers and throw them into the sea, fully declaring in his first -- practically his first public address after 28 years of being in the wilderness in prison, no, this has to be peaceful. this was huge and then you know, you heard president zuma say this is the father, the founding father of our democratic south africa, and you heard robyn talk about the tribal homeland where he lived and the rural area where he's going to be finally laid to rest, and i think i will never forget the pictures not just of the snaking lines of hundreds of thousands of millions of people in the towns and the cities who cast their ballots for nelson mandela in 1994, but the helicopter shots of the countryside, when people were literally lining up in zigzag lines so quietly, so peacefully, so joyfully, just to have the privilege of casting their first ever vote in 1994, this majority black country, they had never had that right before and they stepped up to the plate. ther
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:45am EST
of the guerrilla army, the formation, the armed wing of the anc and the chief of intelligence. slate got this succession of people from different parts of the liberation movement taking over who had been out of the country for longer to time, or had been imprisoned for laundries of time. and to a certain extent that shape some of the mistakes that have been made in the last yea years. >> does thabo mbeki talk but what surprised we came back after all those years and except? >> want to thank you quickly learn when you interview people or politicians and political power is nothing ever surprise them. so the main thing that upset him every time i was into being and is, i would ask that question what would surprise you to what was unusual, what jumped out at you? every, i would say that he would lean back, take a look at me with a lizardlike look when you know you have irritated him. and that would come. know, my brother, never surprised. never admit you were surprised. i think the things that surprised thabo mbeki certainly who was the second president of the liberated south africa was exte
CBS
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
't even tell his anc colleagues that he was doing that. they negotiated for years in private in order to get this done. the persistence, the courage to do that was incredible. >> incredible courage and many occasions, he went against the leadership of the anc, the political movement. and didn't tell them or when he did tell them, he would essentially say i know this is not what you want me to do, but i feel it is the thing we must do and almost all instances, he was proven correct and he was somebody -- >> go ahead, had the respect of them so that they trusted him even though they had great reservations about the other side. >> they had great reservations. they argued with him. but never the less, he was so deserving of trust that even when they disagreed with him, they knew he was the leader and not the leader in a sense of i'm in charge, but in a sense of i am the purpose, the vision, the one who's going to get us there, so trust me. come along with me. walk with me and that was his great strength. >> thank you so much. >> we'll have much more on the life of nelson mandela and talk
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 2:00pm PST
the first legal anc rally in national rally at the soccer stadium you've been talking about the last place mandela appeared during the world cup in 2010. that soccer city was new at the time when i was down in 1989. in that october, that was the first time the anc was allowed to gather in the legal fashion. it was considered a terrorist group at the time. i remember how the crowd hushed for the first time. they raised their hands in the air and sang the national anthem. it means god bless africa, had been illegal up until that point in october 1989. at that point you knew things were changing rapidly and the clerk had started something he wasn't going to be able to stop. a par tide was ending. nelson man dell laugh was to be released from prison. he was held on robin island five miles off the coast and like alcatraz like many years. he talked where he wrote his long walk to freedom, auto biography. they spent grueling hours in the sun breaking rocks on the island looking in the distance at the mountain in cape town and the beautiful cape town in the distance. mandela became close to his pr
CBS
Dec 8, 2013 6:00am PST
in the anc, the african national congress which until the so-called massacre had advocated only peaceful protests. >> there are many people who feel that it is useful for us to continue talking nonviolence against the government. on defenseless people. >> mandela was one of those people he founded the armed wing of anc. considered a revolutionary he was put on trial for sabotage and conspiracy, his defense was a defiant four and a half hour speech that ended this way. >> i have fought against and i have fought against. >> the ideal of democratic and free society he went on. >> for which i am prepared to die. >> he expect to be hanged instead he was sentenced to life in prison. but even locked up nelson mandela was considered a terrorist by the south african government. you could be jailed for wearing a t-shirt like this one or carrying a sign. >> we demand the unconditional release of nelson mandela! >> international pressure to end apartheid and free nelson mandela was incensed. the star studded rock concert held in london in honor of his 70th birthday was seen on television by hundreds
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm PST
understand from many high ranking anc officials homeland security continues to treat some of them as needing a waiver to get into the united states, which is an embarrassment and what secretary rice said today, at the time, we can't allow president mandela, a man of his stature to be continue to be treated as a terrorist by the united states. we needed to do this and do it before he passed away. but also, we need to honor his memory today by also making sure that homeland security honors of legislation that secretary kerry and for that matter senator obama when they were both senators, helped to pass. so, yes, officially they are off the terror list but the way in which homeland security continues to interpret the laws, they are creating problems for the united states. >> that history is a reminder as we're in a moment of what we call international unity, the foreign policy legacy of everything related to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm PST
of anc fought on. one of the first stories i covered was in the anc township where it's zulu warriors from a hostile that marched in the dead of night and slaughtered 40 people women and children among them. so, you know, it was not a simple matter of de klerk deciding to negotiate and everything got easy. you know, white bitter enders assassinated the head of the communist party, one of the most promising young black leaders around that time. a bunch of kind of resistance types tried to storm one of the african so-called homelands. so there were people who tried to keep the fight going. but the balance just had had shift sod dramatically that, you know, de klerk was a realist. and they desperately needed a realist on the other side of the table. >> mr. delms, when i was talking about nelson mandela right before he was officially elected, he gave a lot of credit to the united states. i thought he was being very generous in saying our country was the most -- enemy of the world. do you think united states a as major player in getting him liber liberated and getting his party majority ru
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 1:00pm PST
trying to convince people that the anc was a communist organization and trying to improve the appearance of south africa in the eyes of the west. they -- we have found this quote from a senior south african military intelligence person who said, quote, our strategy was to paint the anc as communist surrogates, the more we could present ourselves as anti-communists, the more people looked at us with respect. people you could have hardly believed cooperated with us politically when it came to the soviets. i mean, april, i was able to find that in like five minutes online. >> yeah. well, i want to put this in perspective. i talked to former president bill clinton yesterday. did an interview with him and he said, you know, with this issue about nelson mandela and his friendships and those who supported him, like gadhafi and ka castro, he said we don't look like ourselves view themselves. when we went on the tour, the historic africa tour with bill clinton in the second term and joburg, nelson mandela was asked a question about the friendships and nelson mandela himself said, look, if you don
MSNBC
Dec 9, 2013 3:00pm PST
to face during the time when he was a splinter unit in the anc. so that was his tactic. they would walk into places where he knew there was a congregation of people and put that message down. and, you know, we shot that scene in a similar way. we didn't tell the audience that i was playing mandela. we didn't tell them anything. they got dressed. they got into the costumes. and they watched that film for about six minutes or so. and cameras were on them watching them. then i walk in and do that. >> now -- go ahead, i'm sorry. >> there are people living in soweto. >> the people in the audience. >> we were very conscious to make sure people were represented from the community we were shooting in. >> this is in south africa. people can get a sense of mandela and what the environment was like. >> that was very important to the film makers to drop the audience right in amongst it and the actors amongst it. make sure we go into and had them in. and they made that. it was apartheid that effected people of south africa. so we needed them to be -- this is not a green screen movie. this is where a
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 11:00am PST
? >> it was quite important because he did something which surprised people. remember, the anc was a radical revolutionary organization. it drew a lot of support from communist countries, from revolutionary movements, castro, gadhafi, arafat. everyone thought he was going to be a left wing maniac. he was very pro business. he was very pro markets because he understood the future of south africa depended on the white business class staying there, being productive. interestingly, 27 years in prison he came out of an old left wing background. he didn't bust the budget spending money on blacks. because of that corporations trusted him. they understood that he didn't want to nationalize anything. he's asking us to behave ethically. i think it's a very good model for the future for third world leaders, particularly to look at. you can, you know, as long as you understand the power of the market, you can also understand that you can ask businesspeople to behave honorably. >> your prime time special "global lessons on guns" tomorrow night 7:00 p.m. right here on cnn. thank you. >>> coming up, elton
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 10:30am EST
, safety in numbers, at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation deteriorating, violence abroad and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything. we found and were able to report back to our respective party leaders, and i had half an hour with an anxious, worried and very uncertain margaret thatcher. we reported back on the tragic success of apartheid in separating one person from another, on the urgency of the need for change to avoid a looming catastrophe and how the united kingdom's public position also needed to change. but we also and apparently rather unusually reported some hope. i said in the house there is a large group of people in south africa who many have ignored. they are those of all races who are working patiently for fellowship and reconciliation in pure human terms by meeting each other and sharing their lives and experiences. some of those with whom we stayed were white opponents of apartheid and have been so for decades, but all -- white and black finish were people who realized that the abolition of the legislat
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 11:00am PST
that in time. but as you note, many regimes, many governments saw him and the anc as terrorists and responded accordingly. >> one of the things that's always struck me about nelson mandela's life was here was a guy who could have had the ultimate chip on his shoulder. and not once did you ever see or hear or read about public bitterne bitterness. nelson mandela never displayed any sort of public bitterness. >> i think nelson mandela, consistent with martin luther king and gandhi and others, i think recognized when he emerged from that prison cell that if he were going to lead south africa, he needed a message not only of reconciliation but of a multiracial south africa. and he did a great job in presenting that message. and i think he surprised people that when he emerged from 27 years of imprisonment, i don't think anyone can imagine what it would be like to spend that much time in a narrow jail cell, to be cut off and then to come back and be so lucid, so politically astute, so politically aware and really emerge as one of the great leaders of our times. >> donald, when we talk about mandel
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm PST
and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's when we really started becoming friends and i had the honor of working with him throughout the entire span of his presidency and one of the things that sometimes gets lost in the incredible personal impact he made on the world because of the way he handled imprisonment is that he was a very, very good president. i think he was an extremely effective president of south africa. >> i remember when you and hillary clinton and the first lady toured that robben island cell where he had spent so many years back in 1998. what was that like? >> well, it was amazing. he talked to me about it and i'll never forget, one of the most enduring conversations i had with him over the many we had in our 20 year friendship was i said you know, i know how you
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
was an advocate of nonviolence. becoming a leading voice in the african national congress, the anc. but in 1960, after police shot and killed 69 protesters, the anc, which had always been nonviolent, created a military wing, under mandela's command. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. >> reporter: undaunted by the brutality and inequality that was apartheid rule, mandela remained determined to end the government's forced racial segregation. >> our struggle is a truly national one. it is a struggle for the right to live. >> reporter: a struggle that led to mandela's imprisonment in 1962. and two years later, a life sentence for working to overthrow the government. >> i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society. it is an ideal for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but my lords, if it needs be, it is an idea for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: four miles off the coast of capetown, south africa, on robben island, mandela spent mos
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